Category Archives: Produce Weekly

Summer Fresh with Honeydew

Honeydew melons are recognizable by their smooth, creamy-yellowish rind and sweet, juicy flesh. The most common honeydew has a pastel-green flesh. Maturity can be hard to judge, but is based upon the ground color which ranges from a greenish white (immature) to a creamy yellow (mature).

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Summer Fresh with Corn

Good quality corn has full, evenly formed and filled ears with straight rows of kernels. The husks will be fresh-looking and bright green, and the silk ends free of decay or worm damage. Be sure the coloring of the kernels is bright and shiny. Pull back the husk and poke one of the kernels at the tip of the silk end with a finger-nail. If juice squirts out and is only slightly cloudy, it’s fresh. If the juice is thick or non-existent, the corn is old.

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Summer Fresh with Kiwi

Did You Know?!
Kiwifruit could also be used as a natural meat tenderizer? That’s because kiwifruit contains an enzyme called Actinidin. Just cut in half and rub kiwifruit over the meat, or peel and mash with a fork then spread it on the surface and let stand for 10 to 15 minutes or longer. The enzyme alse breaks down protein in dairy products,

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Summer Fresh with Cantaloupes

Fun Facts
Cantaloupes are named for the papal gardens of Cantaloupe, Italy, where some historians say this species of melon was first grown.
Cantaloupe comes with its own serving bowl. You can cut them in half through the middle and scoop out each half with a spoon.
Cantaloupes are actually muskmelons, because of its sweet smell.
It is hard to believe, but the great taste of a juicy sweet cantaloupe comes with a very small caloric price: only 50 calories per 6-oz. slice!
The Juicy sweet Cantaloupes are often used as a dessert alternative.
Leaving an uncut Cantaloupe at room temperature for two to four days makes the fruit softer and juicier.
One serving (¼ of a medium melon) provides more than 400 percent of your daily vitamin A, and it also provides nearly 100 percent of your daily vitamin C!

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Summer Fresh with Kohlrabi??

What is it?!
Kohlrabi (German turnip) is a perennial vegetable, and is a low, stout cultivar of cabbage.The name comes from the German Kohl (“cabbage”) plus Rübe ~ Rabi (Swiss German variant) (“turnip”), because the swollen stem resembles the latter. Kohlrabi can be eaten raw as well as cooked. The taste and texture of kohlrabi are similar to those of a broccoli stem or cabbage heart, but milder and sweeter, with a higher ratio of flesh to skin. The young stem in particular can be as crisp and juicy as an apple, although much less sweet.

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Summer Fresh Guava

Guava, an exotic fruit, is grown in tropical and subtropical regions. Before reaching full maturity the thin skin is green, hard, and very astringent. Upon ripening, the fruit softens and the skin turns from green to yellowish green. The flesh varies in color from white to yellowish, light- to dark-pink, or red. The fruit contains numerous tiny seeds.

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Summer Fresh

Peaches and Nectarines

There are hundreds of different peach varieties, which can be divided into two categories–the freestones and the clingstones. In freestone types, the flesh separates readily from the pit. In the clingstone type, the flesh clings tightly to the pit. The flesh may be either yellow or white. Freestone types are usually preferred for eating fresh or for freezing, while clingstone types are used primarily for canning. Nectarines may be either yellow or white-fleshed.
Nectarines can be used in the same way as peaches, and may be considered as substitutes for peaches. The main difference between peaches and nectarines is the lack of fuzz on the nectarine skin. Nectarines tend to be smaller and more aromatic than peaches and have more red color on the fruit surface.

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Summer Fresh

All purple berries are chock-full of vitamin C, which helps form connective tissue and build joint-cushioning cartilage. But blackberries pack a bonus: They contain salicylic acid, a pain-squelching ingredient that’s also in aspirin.

A 12 ounce serving of strawberries has only 97 calories, and eight strawberries contain more Vitamin C than a medium sized orange.

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Summer Fresh

Pineapples have exceptional juiciness and a vibrant tropical flavor that balances the tastes of sweet and tart. They are second only to bananas as America’s favorite tropical fruit. Pineapples are a composite of many flowers whose individual fruitlets fuse together around a central core. Each fruitlet can be identified by an “eye,” the rough spiny marking on the pineapple’s surface. Pineapples have a wide cylindrical shape, a scaly green, brown or yellow skin and a regal crown of spiny, blue-green leaves and fibrous yellow flesh. The area closer to the base of the fruit has more sugar content and therefore a sweeter taste and more tender texture.

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Summer Fresh Grillin & Chillin

Technically speaking, an Idaho potato is any potato grown in the American state of Idaho. Idaho has come to be linked with potato production in the United States, and it produces one of the largest yearly crops of potatoes in the country, after Washington State. The weather and elevation in Idaho make conditions perfect for growing potatoes. Potatoes are naturally high altitude plants, since they were developed in the mountain ranges of South America. In Idaho, a long, mild growing season in the summer pairs with rich, light soil and high elevations to create an ideal potato growing environment. This was realized in the early 1900s, when the Russet Burbank was first brought to the area and the state became a major potato producing powerhouse.

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